appunti spettinati

poche idee, molto confuse...
(few ideas, quite confused)
Benedict Cumberbatch, anche se sembra Dennis Quaid. Con tutto l’Internet che leggo, devo scoprirlo sui giornaletti che è roscio?
[ph. Vanity Fair]

Benedict Cumberbatch, anche se sembra Dennis Quaid. Con tutto l’Internet che leggo, devo scoprirlo sui giornaletti che è roscio? [ph. Vanity Fair]

Infine, andrò a vedere la cosa numero 193, con Bruno Tognolini, perché Bruno Tognolini è capace di scrivere delle cose che tolgon la pelle di dosso, come la Filastrocca per la morte del nonno, che fa così: «Caro nonno, son passati tanti giorni / Ho aspettato e ho capito che non torni / Ti hanno messo come un seme in un bell’orto / Ho guardato e ho capito che sei morto / Vorrei farti ritornare, ma non posso / Nel mio cuore il dolore ha fatto un fosso / In quel fosso come un seme ti ho sepolto / E per innaffiarti bene ho pianto molto / È venuta primavera e sei fiorito / Quando il pianto dei miei occhi era finito / Ora è maggio e oramai non piango più / Nel giardino son fioriti i gigli blu / E io ancora non ti vedo, però ora so perché / Non ti vedo perché sei dentro di me».

lostaff:

Piccoli blog crescono: Lo Staff ha raggiunto il suo primo milione!Grazie tumbleri <3

Go, Tumblr, go!

lostaff:

Piccoli blog crescono: Lo Staff ha raggiunto il suo primo milione!

Grazie tumbleri <3

Go, Tumblr, go!

38 anni. sarà pure photoshoppata, però a me mi pare che se li porta bene assai. (a proposito: chi cavolo è &#8216;sta Keri Russel?)
[ph. Gioia]

38 anni. sarà pure photoshoppata, però a me mi pare che se li porta bene assai. (a proposito: chi cavolo è ‘sta Keri Russel?) [ph. Gioia]

13 Great Facebook Pages for Writers - BOOK RIOT

amandaonwriting:

Facebook. Perhaps a writer’s worst enemy. The procrastination. The temptation. The incessant feed of information.

But need it all be bad? Make your Facebook visits feed your writing by following these great Facebook pages for writers.

1. Poets & Writers

This magazine is a great resource for writers, including information on contests, calls for submissions, and articles about all stages of the writing process. And their Facebook page keeps you plugged into daily writerly news, information, and writerly inspiration.

2. Banned Books Week

The Facebook page for Banned Books Week provides information on injustices within the literary world, currently banned books, and breaking stories on censorship.

3. TED

Writers need inspiration. We need new information and points of view, and TED Talks are a great way to get that inspiration right on your Facebook timeline.

4. NaNoWriMo

NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) isn’t just limited to the month of November. The Facebook page for NaNoWriMo keeps the party going by posting quotes, writing prompts, and information about programs within NaNoWriMo.

5. Writers Write

For more quotes, fun words (hello, vocabulary building), and writing prompts, check out the page for Writers Write.

6. Letters of Note

When living a life of letters, it’s important to remember that writing includes communication – namely, letters. And the Facebook page for Letters of Note provides links to legendary pieces of correspondence from writers and non-writers alike.

7. Academy of American Poets 

Who hasn’t gone to Poets.org to find the perfect poem for a wedding, Intro to Lit assignment, for wooing someone, or even for breaking up? The Facebook page for the Academy of American Poets delivers poems (as you might expect), but also discussions about poetry, its role in our lives, and writerly advice and quotes.

8. Hedgebrook

Hedgebrook is a residency center for women, and their Facebook page is immensely positive and encouraging, providing prompts, quotes, and links to their alumni’s work.

9. Humans of New York

A photography page for writers? Yes. Hear me out. The photography on Humans of New York is not just about snapping a picture and leaving. Brandon, the man behind the camera, is interested in story, in people’s lives. And that’s kind of a writer’s jam. The photography is often inspiring, allowing a little ekphrasis in your Facebook feed.

10. PEN Center USA

The PEN Center strives to protect the rights of writers around the world, especially in places where setting down the truth in a book (even in fiction) can be dangerous, illegal, and/or deadly. The PEN Center spreads awareness, reports on stories, and includes interviews, quotes, and news.

11. Tin House

There are many, many excellent journals to follow on Facebook, and you should, but Tin House has a lively Facebook presence, sharing music, quotes, opportunities, and links to work by Tin House authors.

12. Electric Literature

Electric Literature publishes original fiction in its literary magazine as well as previously published stories in its weekly email blast, Recommended Reading. And their Facebook page hooks readers up with all that great fiction, writerly news, and craft essays.

13. The Writer’s Almanac

The Facebook page for The Writer’s Almanac reminds you, once a day, that it’s time to let the sweet soothing tones of Garrison Keillor remind you of why you became a writer in the first place – and don’t forget that daily dose of poetry to keep you healthy and creative!

instagram:

A World of Childhood Fantasy in Narni, Italy

For more enchanting photos and videos from Narni, Italy, explore the Narni location page and browse the #Narni hashtag.

There are stunning similarities between the real-life town of Narni and the fictional world of Narnia: blazing green hills, clear blue skies and picturesque stone structures.

In fact, the classic fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia, written by C.S. Lewis in 1950, is rumored to have been inspired by this small Italian town 50 miles north of Rome. According to biographer Walter Hooper, Lewis was fascinated by ancient history, and Narni—named “Narnia” in Roman times—was highlighted by the children’s author in his personal atlas.

Whether Lewis visited Narni has never been confirmed, but even today, its cobblestone streets and castle fortress look like they belong in a magical, medieval novel. And while there are no mythical, talking creatures roaming the land, Narni still feels like a place pulled straight out of our childhood imaginations.